ISSUE 65
APRIL 2021
A BRIGHT
FUTURE

YOUNG STARS SHINE
HELL OR HIGH WATER
IN THE HUNTER
LYNDAL OATLEY’S
NEW SOULMATE

PLUS: HEATH’S ROAD TO DRESSAGE GOLD, ROHAN LUXMOORE LOOKS TO THE FUTURE, KERRY MACK’S 23 SHOULDER-IN EXERCISES, WAYNE COPPING & NARACOORTE HORSE TRIALS, LIFE-SIZE HORSE ART, JAPPELOUP ON THE SILVER SCREEN, AMY STOVOLD AIMS HIGH, GENETIC TESTING, DIGESTIVE HEALTH & MORE

AUSTRALIA`S BEST EQUINE MAGAZINE
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ISSUE 65

CONTENTS

APRIL 2021
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A few Words

FROM THE CHAIRMAN

ROBERT MCKAY

Ryan's Rave

TAKE #2: BRISBANE OLYMPICS 2032 DRESSAGE

BY HEATH RYAN

Special feature

THROUGH HELL OR HIGH WATER

BY ELLIE JOLLEY

Showjumping

BILLY RAYMONT GETS THE CHOCOLATES

BY ADELE SEVERS

Dressage

VIVA ELVIVE! LYNDAL’S NEW SOULMATE

BY ELLIE JOLLEY

Training

23 SHOULDER-IN EXERCISES TO IMPROVE YOUR HORSE

BY DR KERRY MACK

Lifestyle

THE LITTLE HORSE THAT COULD

BY SUZY JARRATT

Lifestyle

THE ART OF HORSES IS UNFINISHED BUSINESS

BY ADELE SEVERS

Health

EQUINE DIGESTIVE HEALTH: OMEPRAZOLE & THE MICROBIOME

BY KENTUCKY EQUINE RESEARCH

Health

THE BENEFITS OF GENETIC TESTING

BY DR MAXINE BRAIN

Eventing

ROHAN LUXMOORE LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

BY AMANDA YOUNG

Eventing

THE GOING IS ALWAYS GOOD AT NARACOORTE

BY ADELE SEVERS

Dressage

THE STARS SHINE AT DJWTS

BY DANA KRAUSE

Dressage

A YOUNG RIDER SEIZES THE MOMENT

BY ROGER FITZHARDINGE

Dressage

AMY STOVOLD IS AIMING HIGH AGAIN

BY PHOEBE OLIVER
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Despite their power and brawn, horses have exceedingly sensitive gastrointestinal tracts. From the ease with which some develop Equine Gastric Ulcer Syndrome (EGUS) to the rapid onset of diarrhoea following dietary changes or medication, owners should be vigilant and act quickly when gastrointestinal issues arise.

As an example, take omeprazole, a drug prescribed for the treatment of EGUS in many species, including horses. In humans, omeprazole administration alters the microbiome, the specialised microorganisms that populate the gastrointestinal tract and facilitate digestion.

“Studies show that alterations in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are so profound that the number of bacterial species begin to reach the low levels found in patients suffering severe bacterial diarrhoea,” shared Dr Peter Huntington, a nutritionist for Kentucky Equine Research.

Some human patients taking omeprazole also appear to have a high risk of other infectious causes of diarrhoea, such as salmonellosis.

Dogs treated with omeprazole also show negative changes to the gastrointestinal microbiome. In both humans and dogs, the reported changes in the microbiome occurred within one to two weeks of starting omeprazole.

“One recent study, however, found that horses do not appear as prone to changes in their gastrointestinal microbiomes as humans and dogs. This holds particularly true for the large intestinal microbiome, which was highly stable during the study period with no significant changes in richness and diversity,” Dr Huntington says.

The gastric microbiome did change following treatment with omeprazole, with an increase in pH, which signifies a reduction in acidity. Because the changes in bacterial populations in the stomach varied between horses, no specific type of bacterium was consistently altered in treated horses.

These findings bode well for horses as EGUS occurs frequently in certain populations—up to 93% in Thoroughbred racehorses, for example. As a result, many horses receive omeprazole, either to prevent or treat EGUS, for a minimum of 28 days at a time.

“Kentucky Equine Research offers products designed to support a healthy digestive tract,” says Dr Huntington. “Always choose nutritional products developed by reputable companies.” EQ

*Cerri, S., B. Taminiau, A. Hache-Carré de Lusancay, L. Lecoq, H. Amory, G. Daube, and C. Cesarini. 2020. Effect of oral administration of omeprazole on the microbiota of the gastric glandular mucosa and faeces of healthy horses. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine 34(6):2727-2737.

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